Bionic vision in sight

For people such as Kenny Johor, who has impaired vision due to the inherited degenerative eye disease retinitis pigmentosa, sight means more than appreciating visual beauty.

The ability to see light and darkness and the edge of objects, which is the goal of the first generation bionic eye, will mean increased safety and independence in daily life. Further research developments, such as more electrodes, may provide greater detail, such as the ability to read large print.
 
“One of the things I miss the most is being able to look at people’s facial expressions and their body language. Given more than 95% of communication is not verbal, if the bionic eye could enable me to access this information, that would be simply life-changing.” 
 Kenny Johor
 
Using our engineering and biomedical expertise, our team, as part of the Bionic Vision Australia research consortium, is ensuring the bionic eye is as safe and effective at replacing lost sight as the bionic ear is at replacing lost hearing.
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