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Dr Oscar Murphy, Senior Clinical Research Fellow

Dr Oscar Murphy is registered Clinical Neuropsychologist and Senior Clinical Research Fellow within the Cognitive Disorders Therapy Development team at the Bionics Institute.

As part of his work at the Bionics Institute, Oscar will be working on a clinical trial to investigate the application of magnetic brain stimulation to modulate functional connectivity and improve cognition and memory in Alzheimer’s disease. Oscar’s research interests include investigation of the neurophysiological underpinnings of psychiatric illness, as well as the development, innovation, and evaluation of brain stimulation therapeutics for neurological and psychiatric conditions.

Oscar has expertise in coordinating clinical trials to investigate novel treatments for psychiatric and neurological conditions. Oscar previously worked as a clinical research fellow at the Epworth Centre for Innovation in Mental Health (ECIMH). In this role he served as the site coordinator for several international and domestic multi-site clinical trials, with patient groups including Alzheimer’s disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, autism-spectrum disorder, and major depression.

Completing his Doctor of Clinical Neuropsychology at Monash University, Oscar’s doctoral research used EEG to examine the neurobiological underpinnings of altered cognitive processing in Major Depressive Disorder, and well as investigating the cognitive and electrophysiological effects of applying non-invasive electrical brain stimulation methods in healthy individuals and those with depression. Oscar has particular interest in evaluating the potential clinical benefits of non-invasive brain stimulation including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS). Oscar has presented his research at domestic and international conferences and has been interviewed for radio and print media stories.

Oscar has an interest in teaching and mentorship, having previously worked as a teaching associate across Undergraduate and Graduate Psychology courses at Monash University, as well as a course mentor for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) conducted by Monash University and FutureLearn. Oscar has experience as a supervisor for graduate and post-graduate research students.

E: omurphy@bionicsinstitute.org

ORCID: 0000-0003-3184-9616

Google Scholar: Oscar Murphy

Notable Publications

Murphy, O. W., Hoy, K. E., Wong, D., Bailey, N. W., Fitzgerald, P. B., & Segrave, R. A. (2020). Transcranial random noise stimulation is more effective than transcranial direct current stimulation for enhancing working memory in healthy individuals: Behavioural and electrophysiological evidence. Brain Stimulation, 13(5), 1370-1380.

Murphy, O. W., Hoy, K. E., Wong, D., Bailey, N. W., Fitzgerald, P. B., & Segrave, R. A. (2019). Individuals with depression display abnormal modulation of neural oscillatory activity during working memory encoding and maintenance. Biological Psychology, 148, 107766.

Bailey, N., Biabani, M., Hill, A. T., Miljevic, A., Rogasch, N. C., McQueen, B., … & Fitzgerald, P. (2022). Introducing RELAX (the Reduction of Electroencephalographic Artifacts): A fully automated pre-processing pipeline for cleaning EEG data-Part 1: Algorithm and Application to Oscillations. bioRxiv.

Bailey, N., Hill, A. T., Biabani, M., Murphy, O. W., Rogasch, N. C., McQueen, B., … & Fitzgerald, P. (2022). Introducing RELAX (the Reduction of Electroencephalographic Artifacts): A fully automated pre-processing pipeline for cleaning EEG data-Part 2: Application to Event-Related Potentials. bioRxiv.

Murphy, O. W., Hoy, K. E., Fitzgerald, P. B., Wong, D., & Segrave, R. A. (2017). Behavioural and neurophysiological effects of transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) in healthy and depressed individuals: A TMS-EEG study. Brain Stimulation: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation, 10(2), 393.

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